FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993

(29 USC Sec. 2601, 29 CFR Part 825)

leftlowerpic FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993

The FMLA provides that eligible employees of covered employers have a right to take up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave in any 12-month period for qualifying events without interference or restraint from their employers. The FMLA also gives employees the right to file a complaint with the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor’s Employment Standards Administration, file a private lawsuit under the Act (or cause a complaint or lawsuit to be filed), and testify or cooperate in other ways with an investigation or lawsuit without being fired or discriminated against in any other manner.

The FMLA applies to any employer in the private sector who engages in commerce, or in any industry or activity affecting commerce, and who has 50 or more employees each working day during at least 20 calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.
The law covers all public agencies (state and local governments) and local education agencies (schools, whether public or private). These employers do not need to meet the “50 employee” test. Title II of FMLA covers most federal employees, who are subject to regulations issued by the Office of Personnel Management.

To be eligible for FMLA leave, an individual must (1) be employed by a covered employer and work at a worksite within 75 miles of which that employer employs at least 50 people; (2) have worked at least 12 months (which do not have to be consecutive) for the employer; and (3) have worked at least 1,250 hours during the 12 months immediately before the date FMLA leave begins.

The FMLA provides an entitlement of up to 12 weeks of job-protected, unpaid leave during any 12-month period for the following reasons:

  1. Birth and care of the employee’s child, or placement for adoption or foster care of a child with the employee;
  2. Care of an immediate family member (spouse, child, parent) who has a serious health condition; or
  3. Care of the employee’s own serious health condition.

If an employee was receiving group health benefits when leave began, an employer must maintain them at the same level and in the same manner during periods of FMLA leave as if the employee had continued to work. Usually, an employee may elect (or the employer may require) the use of any accrued paid leave (vacation, sick, personal, etc.) for periods of unpaid FMLA leave.

Employers are required to post a notice for employees outlining the basic provisions of FMLA and are subject to a $100 civil money penalty per offense for willfully failing to post such notice. Employers are prohibited from discriminating against or interfering with employees who take FMLA leave.

CLICK HERE FOR A FULL COPY OF THE FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE ACT FINAL RULE AS NEWLY AMMENDED, NOV. 2008

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ERISA LAWS
ERISA sets minimum standards for participation, vesting, benefit accrual and funding of employee retirement accounts so funds placed in those plans will be there when they retire.

ERISA FAQS
Click here for answers to frequently asked and answered Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) Law questions.

FAMILY LEAVE ACT
The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides certain employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year. It also requires that group health benefits be maintained during the leave. Click here for info on the FMLA.

THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964
Makes it unlawful to refuse to hire, fire or segregate any person from the privileges of employment, because of the individual's race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. 
    
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